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GregJ avatar image

What is the peak output current or maximum surge amps of the 5KW Quattro 12V/230V Inverter?

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Guy Stewart (Victron Community Manager) avatar image
Guy Stewart (Victron Community Manager) answered ·
  • The very short version is in the Spec Sheet.
  • The slightly longer version is this table:




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merle.peter@gmail.com avatar image
merle.peter@gmail.com answered ·

Very confusing - Your spec sheet refers to "Cont output power" and "Peak " Power . Is Nominal = Continuous? So for a 5000VA MP2 can it provide 5000 *130% = 6500VA for 2 Minutes and 7500VA for 5 seconds and 10000VA ( or its it 9000VA ) for 30 cycles and 5000VA for 30 mins = all subject to ambient temp less than 25degC.

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Sorry to say, it is also more confusing than that.

The overload limitations actually refer more to current than RMS power. So a flat battery at 11V will give even less, while a fully charged one at 15V will give even more.

Then if the AC load is some strange power factor, again it will change.

But then less if battery cables are not sufficient thickness, or the batteries slightly too small introducing DC ripple.

Then the altitude of installation.

And so on.

I am not trying to be flippant, or obscure the situation, but trying to pin it down to any one metric will always leave room for another variable in a complex power system.

Once as many of the variables are understood as possible, you can more or less take the data sheet figures at face value, and then also leave yourself a significant margin of safety.

For a helpful rule of thumb, the nameplate power rating that is least 80% of all the combined possible loads operating simultaneously is a good place to start.

ben avatar image
ben answered ·

It's right there on the datasheet, where it says "Peak Power (W)".

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But that's not the Maximum current for even shorter periods, there is a webinar about overload somewhere, should be in writing also somewhere?

@Guy Stewart (Victron Energy Staff)?

Those are 0.5 second peak values. Even higher currents are no doubt available for even shorter periods, sure... but what would we do with that information, even if Victron were to give it to us?

In practice those loads count when starting air conditioners etc.

I'm not sure what you're getting at.

No one provides millisecond-duration specs on inverters or power supplies at this level. They are likely very high, and at the same time not actionable. (What good would it do you to know that the device can supply 5000A for 100ns?)

The 0.5-second peak power value is good enough for deciding how to size for a given load. Big motors come with topologies that smooth their demand over several cycles, for the same reason.

Magnum and Samlex do, I would assume others too, those are just the first two alternatives I checked.

Both list:

1 ms

100 ms

5 sec

30 sec

5 min

30 min

I stand corrected, thanks!

I'm still not sure how it is actionable information. Unless you have a very specific circuit you've either analyzed or measured on a scope, how do you know the surge demand (and, just as importantly, tolerance) for the loads at that resolution?

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