question

Juliian Buss avatar image

AGM Super Cycle DOD of 80% or more - really?

The data sheet of the AGM Super Cycle battery says that I can completely discharge the battery for 300 times when I recharge it soon afterwards.

Does that really mean that the battery still has it's original capacity after 300 times of full discharge up to 10,8V? Or does the capacity decrease during this procedure?

And second question: I'm puzzled why the Super Cycle only weights 57kg while for example an Exide EP2100 with 240Ah weights 72kg. So far I thought more weight equals better quality when it comes to lead acid batteries. Furthermore, the Super Cycle is much smaller than other AGMs. What's the technical difference between Super Cycle and "normal" AGMs so that it can be notable lighter and smaller?

Thanks!

AGM Battery
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1 Answer
Johannes Boonstra (Victron Energy Staff) avatar image

Yes, At lead acid its even so that at the first 20-30cycles the capacity raises a bit (and from there on there is a lowering in capacity over the remaining lifetime) The way this is tested by Victron is

•Fully charge the battery

•Discharge at 0,2C until the required SOC/voltage limit is reached (minimal voltage is 10,8Vdc)

•Leave the battery discharged for 2 hours

•Fully charge again with 8h absorption

I cannot comment on how the Exide is build or how these specs are formulated. The difference between the "normal " AGM and super cycle is mainly that due to more compact cells the supercycle can handle "deep discharge"( so >50% dod ) better. in the 0-50% DOD there is hardly any difference between them.

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